Ondiz

A Novel Idea.

The Inverted Pyramid House is Architecture, Unbound The Inverted Pyramid House is Architecture, Unbound
Architects Makoto Takei and Chie Nabeshima are among the lucky few to make their wildest dreams come true. Their Tokyo-based firm, TNA (keep those... The Inverted Pyramid House is Architecture, Unbound

Architects Makoto Takei and Chie Nabeshima are among the lucky few to make their wildest dreams come true. Their Tokyo-based firm, TNA (keep those jokes to yourselves, gentlemen), was enlisted for Bourdais’s revolutionary vacation home project: Solo Houses. The project is quite literally the stuff of fantasy, whereas it gives architects complete autonomy to design vacation homes for remote areas of Spain. Each architect is confined only by the location, and his or her innate creativity. Consequently, TNA went to the drawing boards and emerged with an inverted pyramid concept that looks straight out.

Based on the available designs, the Inverted Pyramid House is pretty much exactly what it sounds like. That is to say, it’s an upside-down pyramid perched on an isolated Spanish hillside. The home is bursting with modernity by way of radical geometry and a monochromatic sheen inside and out. Earlier designs place a thoroughly modern swimming pool next to the house, though apparently the pool will now be centrally located inside.

To enter the Inververted Pyramid House is to step onto an elevated platform overseeing a dining area. Now inside, you’ll encounter a spacious myriad of rooms, mezzanines, and stairs set against an expanse of minimalist concrete. The occasional slanted window offers unforgettable views of the hilly Spanish. Of course, that hilly terrain might be the least impressive thing you see while staying here.

Forward Thinking in The Back Country House

A cabin in the woods may not be as rustic as you might think anymore. Thanks to technology and sharp design, trailblazing architects are giving the old-fashioned cabin in the woods a total makeover for a whole new generation of people to live in concert with the land around them. One of the most notable may be LTD architect David Maurice’s backcountry house, a two-story residence in New Zealand’s settlement of Puhoi that reinterprets the country’s backcountry huts into desirable yet simple modern residences.

Designed originally for his own family, Auckland-based Maurice concentrated on dedicating the ground level to living, cooking, and eating in a number of rooms that spill out onto an expansive patio and back yard. The second floor is where the bedrooms are, giving a clean separation to the two parts of the home. Tubs have also been built into the expansive deck off the main floor, allowing you to bathe while enjoying the breathtaking New Zealand countryside.

Machiel Vlieland